You Don’t Have to Become Shakespeare in Quarantine

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By now, most of us have gone into social-distancing or quarantine mode due to the COVID-19 health crisis. Many creatives have seen the order to stay home as a blessing in disguise. It was seen as a time to take up new hobbies and get to that writing that we never seem to have time for. One of my friends compared it to an unexpected writing sabbatical. On Twitter, I saw a number of people talking about how Shakespeare wrote King Lear during the Plague, and that they had aspirations to do the same. When I was working my last shift before the library closed, a colleague asked me what I was going to do with my time off, and I confidently replied, “Finish my book.”

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The Paradox of Wanting Feedback

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Recently, I “finished” writing my book. I say “finished” because in my head it was done, but in reality it was not. Yeah, yeah, I still needed to copy-edit it, but all the major work was done (or so I thought). In January and February, I had send my book out to a number of people in my life who offered to read it, and while I was awaiting their feedback, I was working on doing the copy-edits. Looking back, I don’t know what I thought would happen.

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On Keeping a Personal Archive

IMG_5131-2Ever since I started working in the Local History department at the library, I have had a whole new appreciation for the personal archive. So many things that we have in our collection are things that I would have thrown away or found too mundane to save, if I was living a hundred years ago. All the old receipts, income tax forms, random photos of buildings and other paper paraphernalia tell the story of our city. While processing these things at work, I’ve had a lot of time to think about the stuff that I’m saving and recording in my own life. I’ve been thinking about this for years, but it was brought to mind again this past Christmas when my grandfather gave me something from his personal archive.

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All Aboard the Productivity Train

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One of the biggest challenges I face is just getting started. I’ll lay around all day, puttering with this and that, waiting until the absolute last minute to open up that Word document and start writing. But, once I finally sit down and spend ten minutes working on a piece, I usually get into the zone and focused. When I get into the work, it always seems so silly that it took me so long to get started. Even so, I know that I’ll still fall into the same procrastination routine time and time again.

Based on my conversations with other writers, I know that I’m not the only one who struggles with the procrastination beast, so I wanted to share a little trick that has been working for me lately.

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On What’s Been Changing Lately and Being an Entrepreneur of Creativity

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Since the beginning of 2019, I’ve been in a period of change. Good changes, I would say. The hours of my second job slowed right down, since it’s the beginning of the fiscal year, so I’ve had lots of time for creative things. One of the reasons I started this blog was to let people into my often solitary creative life, so I wanted to share a little bit of a 2019-so-far life update. Continue reading “On What’s Been Changing Lately and Being an Entrepreneur of Creativity”

On Finishing 2018 and Draft 2

img_0587About three weeks ago two things were winding down: the second draft of my book and the year of 2018. I had hoped to have the draft done before Christmas, but as Dec. 25th drew closer and the stress mounted, I decided to push the goal back to New Year’s. Of course I got a little too comfortable with the extension and found myself racing to finish the draft before heading out to my New Year’s Eve party on Dec. 31st. I ended up being a little late to the party, but it was worth it. I really wanted to leave draft 2 of my novel in 2018, and I’m pleased to say that I was able to do that.

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On National Novel Writing Month and Playing the Long Game

IMG_0686-2The beginning of December marks the end of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) for many writers. For those of you who don’t know, writers participating in NaNoWriMo make the goal to write 50,000 words in a month (aprox. 1,666 words/day). I am definetly a goal-oriented person, so you can see how a challenge like this might appeal to me. However, I am rewriting my book, not writing a first draft like most people in the challenge, so the 50,000 word goal didn’t really make sense for me. Still wanting to join in on the comradery, I decided to challenge myself to simply work on my rewrites every day.

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On Being a Writer with a Day Job(s)

IMG_0674-2For a long time it felt like my paying jobs were always at odds with my writing. I felt as though the two parts of my life were always battling for my time and interest. Both were important and fulfilling to me, but seemed to be in opposition of each other. It often felt like my paid jobs were robbing my creative pursuits, but I was the one organizing the entire heist. The relationship between my jobs and my writing has always turbulent and a bit paradoxical, but over the last few weeks of working more hours than I ever intended, my creative frustration came to a breaking point and the writing slowed to a stop. The jobs weren’t going away and neither was my writing, so I knew that I needed to figure out how to balance these two parts of my life.

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